DIY Directions

Do it yourself and save!

Anyone with a basic understanding of construction can insulate their own home. All it takes is a little time, effort … and EnviroGuard® Cellulose Insulation!

Suitable Applications:

Here is what you will need:

  • EnviroGuard Cellulose Insulation
    Coverage Chart

    Insulation Zone 1 2 3 4 5 6
    Gas R-49 R-49 R-49 R-38 R-38 R-22
    Oil, Heat Pump R-49 R-49 R-49 R-38 R-38 R-38
    Electric Furnace R-49 R-49 R-49 R-49 R-49 R-49

    1. Determine your Insulation Zone by finding your location in the map above. Then use the chart above to determine the R-rating recommended by the U.S. Department of Energy based on your type of HVAC.
    2. Measure your attic to determine its area in square feet. Do the same for any walls to be insulated. Then refer to the Coverage Chart printed on the EnviroGuard Insulation bag to determine the minimum number of bags to purchase. Remember to account for any insulation already in the attic.

  • Coverage Map Insulation blowing machine
    These can usually be rented from the retailer where you purchase your insulation.
  • Dust Mask Dust masks (NIOH-approved N95 or higher)
  • Safety Glasses Safety glasses
  • Depth Marker Depth markers (for attics)

If insulating walls in existing homes, you will also need:

  • Hole Saw A 1–2" hole saw or drill bit
  • Blow Hose Nozzle A nozzle for the insulation blowing hose
  • Dry Wall Tools Tools and materials for repairing drywall

Blowing your attic

  1. Working on Attic Joists You may need to place a board across the ceiling joists in order to stand securely in the attic. Do not walk on the drywall. Too much weight will crack the ceiling. A dust mask and adequate lighting are recommended.
  2. Protected Recessed Light Can Make sure all heat producing objects (recessed lights, exhaust flues, water heaters, furnaces, etc.) are protected from the insulation by installing a barrier to prevent insulation from coming within 3" of the object.
  3. Air Duct Check If duct work is present in the attic, make sure it is adequately sealed with duct tape.
  4. In existing homes, measure the current depth of insulation across the attic to get an approximate average. Determine approximate current R-value of existing insulation based on current insulation installed.
  5. Determine R-value of insulation to be installed according to DOE.
  6. Attic insulation depth marker Use depth markers on vertical members to indicate the desired depth.
  7. Cover the attic entrance with plastic to prevent unwanted insulation from entering the home's living spaces.
  8. Set up the blowing machine and make a stack of bags next to the machine as a working table. Place a bag on top of the stack, open the sealed end of the bag, and start breaking up the insulation as you feed the material into the hopper. NEVER fill the material over the round bars in the hopper. The best height is just above the agitator tines. NEVER reach into the hopper while the machine is plugged in. NEVER place a whole bag of insulation into the hopper at once.
  9. Hold the hose at an upward angle of 15% to obtain the best results.
  10. Begin insulating at the back of the attic area and work towards the entrance, making certain that you do not cover heat producing devices. A 3" gap is required around these devices for safety. This barrier may be made of furnace pipe or cardboard with an open top. Make sure no insulation gets in this barrier.
  11. Be sure you do not cover soffit vents, as the attic must be properly ventilated to dissipate excess heat and moisture during the summer.
  12. Pack insulation under decking not insulated.
  13. Clean all drain pans around and on any appliances, and sweep decks.
  14. Insulated Attic Door Tent or Cover Install an attic tent or similar entrance sealing and insulating cover over the entrance.

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Blowing side walls in existing homes

Side walls require patience and planning. Caution must be exercised. Too much pressure in the wall cavity can cause the wall covering to push away.

  1. Find the wall cavities between studs with a stud finder. In some cases, nail heads can be seen on interior or exterior walls, revealing the pattern of the studs.
  2. Measuring 12" down from the ceiling and 24" up from the floor in the center of each cavity, drill two (2) 1" holes.  Add a third hole in the middle if your walls are 10' or higher.
  3. Set up the blowing machine and make a stack of bags next to the machine as a working table. Place a bag on top of the stack, open the sealed end of the bag, and start breaking up the insulation as you feed the material into the hopper. NEVER fill the material over the round bars in the hopper. The best height is just above the agitator tines. NEVER reach into the hopper while the machine is plugged in. NEVER place a whole bag of insulation into the hopper at once.
  4. Start filling the cavity, filling the bottom hole first and continue to fill until the insulation stops flowing through the nozzle. Turn the machine off and move to the next hole. You may fill all the bottom holes first or do one cavity at a time, whichever works best for you.
  5. Plug the holes with plastic, foam, or wood plugs.

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Blowing side walls in new homes (prior to sheetrock)

  1. Apply non-expanding foam around doors, windows, all penetrations to non-living areas (e. g., outside attics, garages, porches), and between floors.
  2. Install baffles in soffit areas to allow airflow through the attic.
  3. Install a backing behind common/knee walls. Use a netting, foam board, sheetrock, or thermoply for backing.
  4. Sweep floors so insulation material can be recycled without contamination.
  5. Cover in plastic windows and anything else you don't want to come into contact with insulation.
  6. Set up the blowing machine and make a stack of bags next to the machine as a working table. Place a bag on top of the stack, open the sealed end of the bag, and start breaking up the insulation as you feed the material into the hopper. NEVER fill the material over the round bars in the hopper. The best height is just above the agitator tines. NEVER reach into the hopper while the machine is plugged in. NEVER place a whole bag of insulation into the hopper at once.
  7. Install insulation in exterior walls and other areas not accessible after sheetrock application (e.g., between floors, under A/C units, under attic decking, slopes, floors over garages and porches).

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Blowing crawlspaces and underneath existing floors

  1. Make sure the bottoms of the floor joists are at least 10 above any ground that may collect water.
  2. Secure the substrate (non-stretch netting, chicken wire, foam board, plywood, etc.) to the bottoms of the floor joists underneath the house.
  3. Approximately every 4—10 feet, depending on any obstructions in the cavity (e. g., pipes, wires), cut holes big enough for the blowing hose to fit through.
  4. Set up the blowing machine and make a stack of bags next to the machine as a working table. Place a bag on top of the stack, open the sealed end of the bag, and start breaking up the insulation as you feed the material into the hopper. NEVER fill the material over the round bars in the hopper. The best height is just above the agitator tines. NEVER reach into the hopper while the machine is plugged in. NEVER place a whole bag of insulation into the hopper at once.
  5. Insert the hose and push it into the cavity as far as possible.
  6. Insulate making sure to pack the insulation in the cavity to minimize future settling. Be sure to slowly pull the hose back as you insulate so you don’t over pack the insulation in the cavity. You will hear the machine “bog” down as the cavity begins to pack full of insulation.
  7. Plug the hose access opening and repeat steps 1—5 for each cavity until all cavities are full of insulation.

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Blowing cathedral ceilings

  1. Approximately every 4—10 feet from the bottom of the cavity (depending on obstructions in the cavity (e. g., pipes, wires), cut holes big enough for the blowing hose to fit through.
  2. Set up the blowing machine and make a stack of bags next to the machine as a working table. Place a bag on top of the stack, open the sealed end of the bag, and start breaking up the insulation as you feed the material into the hopper. NEVER fill the material over the round bars in the hopper. The best height is just above the agitator tines. NEVER reach into the hopper while the machine is plugged in. NEVER place a whole bag of insulation into the hopper at once.
  3. Insert the hose and push it into the cavity as far as possible.
  4. Begin insulating making sure to pack the insulation in the cavity to minimize future settling. Be sure to slowly pull the hose back as you insulate so as not to over pack the insulation in the cavity. You will hear the machine “bog” down as the cavity begins to pack full of insulation. Over packing on this step can cause damage to the sheetrock.
  5. Plug the hose access openings and repeat steps 1—5 for each cavity until all cavities are full of insulation.

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